Oil Painting – Day 2

So I got in trouble today. Doing what’s been done for centuries. Imprimatura from Wikipedia —”Imprimatura is a term used in painting, meaning an initial stain of color painted on a ground. It provides the painter with a transparent, toned ground which will allow light falling onto the painting to reflect through the paint layers. The term itself stems from the Italian and literally means “first paint layer”. Its use as an underpainting layer can be date back to the guilds and workshops of the Middle Ages; however it comes into standard use by painters during the Renaissance, particularly in Italy. … … An imprimatura is usually made with an earth color, such as raw sienna and often diluted with turpentine.”

So I used turpentine for my imprimatura. One of the women from the studio couldn’t handle the smell gave me a whole lot of grief and left. I got in trouble for what’s been done for centuries. She said,”We’ve never had a problem with Ned” (who oil paints). I’m sorry but I’m not Ned and don’t want to be Ned.

Anyway I was able to carry on and draft out the base of my painting in grisaille. I do my own spin on Venetian Glaze Painting. It’s my version of the way I was taught by an accomplished painter.

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3 comments

  1. a little turpentine never hurt anyone. right? I mean c’mon. once in a while is ok. I’m old school though, back when there was no such thing as OSHA and MSDS.. Material Safety Data Sheets … of course they have a place today. but unless the “rules” are posted for everyone to follow at the studio, fuckem. enjoying your process.


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